AskDefine | Define suction

Dictionary Definition

suction

Noun

1 a force over an area produced by a pressure difference
2 the act of sucking [syn: sucking, suck]

Verb

1 remove or draw away by the force of suction; "the doctors had to suction the water from the patient's lungs"
2 empty or clean (a body cavity) by the force of suction; "suction the uterus in an abortion"

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Etymology

sugere (to suck)

Pronunciation

Noun

  1. The principle of physics by which matter is drawn from one space into another because the pressure inside the second space is lower than the pressure in the first.
  2. The principle of physics by which one item is caused to adhere to another because the pressure in the space between the items is lower than the pressure outside that space.
  3. The process of creating an imbalance in pressure to draw matter from one place to another.

Translations

process
  • Czech: sání
  • French: succion
  • German: Saugwirkung
  • Italian: aspirazione
  • Spanish: succión

Verb

  1. To create an imbalance in pressure between one space and another in order to draw matter between the spaces.
  2. To draw out the contents of a space.

Adjective

  1. Of or relating to something that operates by the principle of creating an imbalance in pressure to draw matter from one place to another.

Translations

process
  • French: sucer
  • German: lutschen
  • Italian: succhiare
  • Spanish: succionar, chupar

Extensive Definition

Suction is the flow of a fluid into a partial vacuum, or region of low pressure. The pressure gradient between this region and the ambient pressure will propel matter toward the low pressure area. Suction is popularly thought of as an attractive effect, which is incorrect since vacuums do not innately attract matter. Dust being "sucked" into a vacuum cleaner is actually being pushed in by the higher pressure air on the outside of the cleaner.
The higher pressure of the surrounding fluid can push matter into a vacuum but a vacuum cannot attract matter.

Suction in biology

Infants, and all baby mammals, are born with a sucking (or suckling) reflex, which they use in nursing liquid foods, such as milk. They do not have to learn this reflex, because it is instinctive. Some adult animals use suction in drinking, as do humans when using drinking straws. In breathing, the diaphragm muscle is used to expand the lungs, allowing air to enter due to the outside air pressure.
Large plants can actually create a negative pressure by transpirational pull.

Pumps

Pumps used for pumping or moving fluids typically have an inlet where the fluid enters the pump and an outlet where the fluid comes out. The inlet location is said to be at the suction side of the pump. The outlet location is said to be at the discharge side of the pump. Operation of the pump creates suction (a lower pressure) at the suction side so that fluid can enter the pump through the inlet. Pump operation also causes higher pressure at the discharge side by forcing the fluid out at the outlet. There may be pressure sensing devices at the pump's suction and/or discharge sides which control the operation of the pump. For example, if the suction pressure of a centrifugal pump is too low, a device may trigger the pump to shut off to keep it from running dry; i. e. with no fluid entering.
Under normal conditions of atmospheric pressure suction can draw pure water up to a maximum height of approximately 10.3 m (33.9 feet).

See also

suction in Danish: Sutte
suction in Swedish: Sugning
suction in Yiddish: זייגן

Synonyms, Antonyms and Related Words

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